US: GOP’s Project Grow withers. Madison, WI among ‘Best cities for feminists’. Do Male or Female Physicians Do More Housework?

Black Women Are an Electoral Voting Force. Recognize. RH Reality Check The 2014 midterm elections are fast approaching, and Planned Parenthood Action Fund has just rolled out its campaign to help educate voters about candidates’ positions on women’s health. “We know that women’s health is a winning issue and that no candidate will be able to win without a plurality of women,” the group’s president, Cecile Richards, said in a statement announcing the launch of the effort, dubbed the “Women are Watching” campaign, which is expected to spend more than $18 million in at least 14 states.

All this is great news for those of us who are big supporters of access to birth control and safe abortion care. And yet, the announcement has left me feeling cold and disconnected.

GOP’s Project Grow starts to wither MSNBC There was certainly nothing wrong with House Republicans making a conscious effort to improve its gender diversity – remember the committee chairmen chart? – but Jay Newton-Small checked on Project GROW’s progress and found that the party is “coming up short.”

Thirty years ago, Republicans and Democrats had equal numbers of female politicians, but since then Democratic female representation has taken off dramatically. Part of the problem is that Republican female state legislators tend to be more moderate than their male counterparts and therefore have a tougher time getting through increasingly partisan primaries, according to Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers University. […]
Indeed, last election cycle 108 Republican women ran in House primaries, according to data compiled by Walsh’s center. Less than half won and only 20 were elected to Congress, most of them incumbents. The 19 Republican women currently serving in the House make up only 4.4 percent of the House, and only 8 percent of the GOP conference.
Those numbers are actually poised to get worse.

 

Which states were among the first to elect women to top political offices? Washington Post (blog) The great map and history lesson about the women’s suffrage movement over at GovBeat, which looks at states that led the way in giving women the vote, got us to thinking about how those states stack up now in terms of electing women to high office.

Well, it turns out that the 10 states that granted women the ballot before the movement gained steam on March 3, 1914, when representatives of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage testifying in a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee, have among the best records for electing women to higher office.

First, the throwback map that highlights the 10 states:

Madison ranked among ‘Best cities for feminists’ Madison.com Madison was left off a list of Best Cities for Hippies last year but it has just made a new list of 11 Best Cities for Feminists.

The online real estate service Estately didn’t rank the feminist cities in any order but did include Madison on the list that includes Washington, D.C., Detroit and Portland, Ore., along with a couple of surprises like Macon, Ga. and Honolulu.

“With plenty of emerging technology, Madison is a great place for women in STEM to make a good living, while also taking advantage of the University of Wisconsin’s many academic forums and opportunities. Wisconsin Women in Government also does great work to advance the number of females serving in political office,” Estately writes.

Female chemistry professors call for boycott after congress does not include women in list The Daily Princetonian Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Emily Carter is joining two other female theoretical chemists in a call for the boycott of the 15th International Congress of Quantum Chemistry because its preliminary list of speakers did not include women.

Laura Gagliardi, chemistry professor at the University of Minnesota, and Anna Krylov, chemistry professor at the University of Southern California, composed an open letter with Carter. The petition, an appeal to “condemn gender-biased discriminatory practices of which ICQC-2015 is the most recent example,” amassed 1,645 signatures by Monday evening.

The petition was in response to a partial list of speakers published on the ICQC website, Krylov said. Among the 24 speakers and five chairs mentioned, the list featured no women.

Carter, who began drawing attention to this issue by personally boycotting conferences 14 years ago, said she was in disbelief when she received emails from Krylov and Gagliardi explaining the lack of women at the ICQC.

Gender Gap: Do Male or Female Physicians Do More Housework? Physicians News Digest They found that female docs “spent 8.5 more hours per week on domestic activities,” according to the study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers focused their study on a specific subset of “physician-researchers who had received career development awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).”

There were several reasons the researchers focused on this academic group of physicians. First, these doctors are less constrained by time than other physicians who are more tied to a strict schedule of patient visits and surgeries.  Also, the men and women who choose an academic field do so because it ”is intellectually engaging, it affords the opportunity for self-determination (to be one’s own boss), and it is the coin of the realm in academics,” said Molly Cooke, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco and author of an accompanying editorial.

About psawomenpolitics

The UK Political Studies Association Women and Politics Specialist Group. Resource for researchers working on women and/or gender and for women in the PSA. The 2014 Specialist Group of the Year.
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