‘Behind Every Great Woman Is an Effective Quota System’? Gender politics, least funny thing about comedy.

 

Labour MP for Ashfield, Gloria De Piero, Shadow Minister for Women, visits and chats to mothers in Roath, Cardiff.

What Women Want: Welsh mums explain child care and school places difficulties  WalesOnline Surrounded by crawling babies and armed with baby milk and tea, a group of mums told former journalist turned Labour MP Gloria De Piero what women actually want. Her visit to the home of Cardiff mother-of-two Lucy Wheeler yesterday was part of her ‘What Women Want’ tour.

The MP for Ashfield in Nottinghamshire, who became shadow minister for women and equalities in October, has already met different groups of women from across the UK. Other groups include a netball team in Darlington and a bingo club in Edinburgh.

Labour Stoke-on-Trent North hopeful Zaeba Hanif wants to be champion of the people Stoke Sentinel LABOUR activist Zaeba Hanif believes her selection as a Parliamentary candidate would ‘send shockwaves’ around the country.

The mother-of-two is among the eight women hoping to be chosen to contest the Stoke-on-Trent North seat for Labour in next year’s General Election.

Ms Hanif says that her experiences of raising a family, working and volunteering in the city makes her unique among the applicants. She claims that as MP she would be a ‘champion’ for ordinary people in Stoke-on-Trent North.

MP launches safety survey for young women Messenger Newspapers STRETFORD and Urmston MP Kate Green has launched a survey asking young women how safe they feel going about their daily lives, and whether they have experienced harassment, abuse or violence.

The survey is available on the MP’s website. The findings will be used to shape Labour’s policy on young women’s safety.

Ms Green said: “I know how important it is for women to feel safe whether they’re at school, working, travelling or simply having a night out.

“Labour wants all women to be safe, wherever they are.

Deputy Labour leader Harriet Harman WalesOnline Harriet Harman has refused to admit that mistakes were made over a historic paedophile rights campaign to which she has been linked, insisting she stood by her actions “all the way through”.

The deputy Labour leader insisted the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE) was “challenged” and “pushed aside” during its affiliation to a civil rights organisation she worked for and claimed she was the victim of a “politically-motivated smear campaign”.

Ms Harman and her MP husband Jack Dromey broke their silence after the Daily Mail ran a series of stories about their actions while officials at the National Council for Civil Liberties (NCCL) in the 1970s.

These 6 Charts Prove Publishing Has a Long Way to Go Towards Gender Equality PolicyMic Every year for the past four years, VIDA, an organization devoted to women in literary arts, has tallied the gender disparity in the publishing world. The VIDA Count, as the tally is called, includes the number of women featured as both authors and subjects in reviews and articles in a variety of literary publications.

The 2013 VIDA Count has just been released, and while it reveals some progress (The Paris Review for example, has shown major strides towards equality) , other major publications likeThe New Republic and The Atlantic remain startlingly behind. VIDA’s list is an important reminder that despite what we may think and hope, “Women’s writing continues to be disproportionately omitted from the pages of career-making journals.”

Here are the most important takeaways from this year’s count.

‘Behind Every Great Woman Is an Effective Quota System’ – Is This the Future of Women in the … Huffington Post UK Another day, another demand for female quotas. From the boardroom to the cabinet, the call for women to be given a professional leg-up seems to be gathering momentum. First there was Fiona Hotston Moore’s well-articulated argument for David Cameron to introduce temporary quotas for women in top posts in politics and the civil service. Not to be left out, Labour “could” introduce quotas for women (and ethnic minorities) to address inequalities within boardrooms, according to shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna. Interestingly both Hotston-Moore and Umunna’s comments follow publication of a study by recruitment consultancy Green Park which found that only 12 of the FTSE 100’s 289 senior posts (chair, chief executive or finance director) were filled by women.

Are we ready for a female president? Bachmann says no. Washington Post (blog) A lot of Americans still “aren’t ready” for a female president, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) told syndicated columnist Cal Thomas in an interview earlier this week. ”I don’t think there is a lot of pent-up desire for a woman president,” she said.

The reaction to Bachmann’s latest comment is no surprise.

“I found her remarks shocking and disappointing, especially since she took the initiative to run for president herself,” said Marianne Schnall, author of “What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?” ”Why would she do that if she felt this way?”

Even Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who lost his own bid for the presidency in 2008, told CNN’s Piers Morgan that former secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton “would most likely” win if the election were held tomorrow.

“I just have a very different reading of the political scene,” McCain explained. He cited “the growth of women” in Congress, as well as the many female mayors and governors throughout the country. “We’re proud we’ve had women governors here in Arizona, two in a row.”

Clinton: Men also responsible for women’s rights Macon Telegraph (blog) WASHINGTON — Hillary Rodham Clinton says that men are also responsible for advancing rights and opportunities for women around the world. The former secretary of state says “it’s not a women’s issue” but, in her words, “a responsibility that we all share.”

On Tuesday, Clinton presided over Georgetown University’s annual Hillary Rodham Clinton Awards for Advancing Women in Peace and Security. She says it’s not a mistake but a message that all three winners are men. Clinton is contemplating a run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016.

Gender politics are the least funny thing about comedy Irish Independent (blog) 

The BBC’s proposal to ban all-male comedy panels has thrown up an interesting conversation about the future of comedy.

Earlier this week, Dara O’ Briain, who was initially mis-quoted as being against the idea of ‘token women’, clarified his position and called for more female comedians to enter the arena.

And therein lies the rub.

Gender quotas are never a good idea. They marginalise women, and turn the genders against each other. Opponents make the argument that the best person for the job is shunted for one with the right chromosomes, and women selected for jobs this way can be taken less seriously as contenders, as workers and as professionals. Gender quotes could stigmatise the women they’re attempting to empower.

However, without gender quotas, how do we ensure equality? We can’t.

Afghan Youth Debates: Men Preventing Women From Voting is “Biggest Challenge” Institute for War and Peace Reporting Students living in the Ghoryan district of Herat province in western Afghanistan have questioned local officials on a wide range of election-related issues as the country gears up to elect a successor to President Hamed Karzai.

Undergraduates attending the IWPR-backed debate on January 23 were keen to learn more about women’s rights, the role young people can play in the elections, and the role of the media.

Karimi, a participant, asked the panel why women should bother taking part in the April 5 elections and what obstacles they might face if they tried.

International Conference on Gender, Empowerment and Conflict in South Asia Peace Research Institute Oslo ​The Mahanirban Calcutta Research Group (MCRG) and the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) are jointly organizing the International Conference on “Gender, Empowerment and Conflict in South Asia”. This is the final conference for a collaborative project entitled Making Women Count for Peace: Gender, Empowerment and Conflict in South Asia.

Tunisia: First female presidential candidate presents herself Iranian The Leader of the Democratic Movement for Construction and Reform (MDER) in Tunisia, Amna Mansour, announced her candidacy for the next presidential elections, making her the first woman in the history of the country to run for presidency.

Mansour told Tunisian radio station Mosaic on Monday that she is capable of adding value to many areas and that her candidacy helps towards strengthening the presence of women in decision-making circles and positions of responsibilities.

2015 presidency: Where are the female contenders? Nigerian Tribune As the 2015 general elections draw near, a number of politicians have gone into frenzy, advertising the positions they hope to vie for. STEPHEN GBADAMOSI examines the seeming lack of interest of female politicians in elective posts.

Mrs Sarah Jubril is a notable Nigerian politician. As far back as the period of the defunct Social Democratic Party (SDP) and the National Republican Convention (NRC) days, she has been contesting the presidential election. Indeed, she did several times, though her dream was at no time realised. Also, late Major Moji Obasanjo took a shot at the position on the ticket of the Masses Movement of Nigeria (MMN) in 2007.

Why the LRB should stop cooking up excuses over lack of women reviewers The Guardian (blog) A week after publishing ‘The Public Voice of Women’, Mary Beard’s lecture on the silencing of women throughout history, the London Review of Books issued a pre-emptive defence of their own editorial policy on women contributors. The statement went out on an episode of Radio 4’s Open Book in which presenter Mariella Frostrup asked why women writers are reviewed less, and write fewer reviews, than their male counterparts. The LRB declined to participate in the discussion but issued, in Frostrup’s words, “a rather lengthy statement”.

Emily Modrowski: What feminists shouldn’t be Independent Collegian What is a feminist?
Let’s start off with saying what they aren’t: they’re not frightening, gross monster-women who’ve come to kill men in the night. There seems to be a stigma attached to the word “feminist” that sees it as a woman who’s off her rocker and who hates all men and everything to do with them. A feminist is sometimes seen as a hairy ogre who despises razors and lipstick.

Gender pay gap in Netherlands higher than EU average IamExpat.nl Recent statistics published by the European Commission’s Eurostat agency show that the unadjusted gender pay gap in the Netherlands in 2012 was 17,3 per cent, higher than the EU average of 16,4 per cent.

In fact, the Netherlands has the 11th largest gender pay gap in the EU, higher than (among others) Italy, Belgium, France, Denmark and Sweden.

While the Netherlands was ranked 13 in the world for gender equality by the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2013, the report did highlight the pay gap as one area that was more unequal than others.

Workshop aims to address women’s issues, find viable solutions Oman Daily Observer MUSCAT — The third workshop, entitled ‘Cultural, Educational and Media Rights: Towards an Arab Document for Woman Rights’ began at the Council of Oman yesterday under the auspices of Khalid bin Hilal al Maawali, Chairman of the Majlis Ash’shura. The 2-day workshop aims to prepare for the conference ‘Women’s Issues and Contemporary Challenges’. The Chairman of the Majlis Ash’shura said that the workshop was organised by the Council of Oman – ‘State Council and Majlis Ash’shura’ in cooperation with the Arab Parliament to discuss women’s issues to find viable solutions. He added in a press statement that women of the Sultanate since the beginning of the Renaissance have had an active role and participant in all walks of life, including the Shura.

About psawomenpolitics

The UK Political Studies Association Women and Politics Specialist Group. Resource for researchers working on women and/or gender and for women in the PSA. The 2014 Specialist Group of the Year.
This entry was posted in Gender and Politics in the media and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s