Gender and Politics in the media

Porn wars: the debate that’s dividing academia. We Just Don’t Get Female Politicians.

Turns Out We Don’t Stereotype Female Politicians. We Just Don’t Get Them At All. Slate Magazine …In “Measuring Stereotypes of Female Politicians,” published in Political Psychology this month, political scientists Dr. Monica Schneider and Dr. Angela Bos surveyed a group of students about the traits they associate with women in general, and the characteristics they ascribe to female politicians specifically. They found that while over 90 percent of respondents described women as feminine, emotional, motherly, and beautiful, they were far less likely to associate female politicians with those traits. Eighty-four percent of participants described women as “gorgeous.” None of them said the same of female politicians. Female politicians didn’t even benefit from those stereotypes—like compassion and sensitivity—that are often cited as potential advantages for women in office. Ninety-one percent of people described women in general as “compassionate,” but only 21 percent described female politicians that way. And female politicians weren’t associated with stereotypically masculine traits—like leadership, competence, confidence, assertiveness, and charisma—either. You’d think that “leader” would be a defining characteristic for any politician, but only 39 percent of participants described female politicians with that term; 93 percent of them described male politicians that way. Women in politics were, however, more likely to be described as “uptight” and “dictatorial.”

Students start magazine to confront issues of women’s empowerment The Courier-Journal The women behind Aberrance Quarterly: A collective of JCPS students launched a new magazine devoted to covering women’s empowerment, but they’re aiming for a much wider audience than fellow students.

Female student leaders accuse leadership of bias Republica “When I opposed yesterday´s election ordinance which proposes the reduction women representation from 33% to 25%, the party leadership took my stance as a joke”, she said. Vice-Chairman of CPN (UML) Bidya Bhandari cast her doubt if fresh CA polls …

 

Exploring the proliferation of porn: Clarissa Smith, left, and Feona Attwood. Photograph: Katherine Rose

Porn wars: the debate that’s dividing academia The Guardian When the Guardian announced the planned launch next year of Porn Studies – the world’s first peer-reviewed academic journal on the subject – there were more than a few guffaws. “You can just see a future University Challenge,” wrote one commenter online. “Carruthers, King’s College Cambridge, reading pornography.”

“It just sounds like a highbrow wank mag to me,” wrote another. “One which I look forward to perusing.” Even the headline had a touch of Viz magazine’s Finbarr Saunders and his double entendres about it, suggesting it was a “new discipline” for academics.

What it concealed, however, is a bitter and contentious academic war over the status and nature of porn research, a war that is almost as bitter and contentious as the status and nature of porn itself.

Women leaders rue poor presence in student bodies Republica KATHMANDU, June 14: Senior women leaders of the Nepali Congress and CPN-UML have expressed dissatisfaction over the poor representation of female students in the student wings of their respective parties. Addressing an interaction organized in the …

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